Skagit Valley Daffodils and Snow Geese

Skagit Valley Daffodils and Snow Geese

Skagit Valley Daffodils, Skagit Valley Daffodils and Snow GeeseDaffodils Fields in the Skagit Valley  #50700

Daffodils and Snow Geese in the Skagit Valley, two sure signs that spring is here in the Northwest, even if the weather says it isn’t.

If you’re planning on visiting this famous destination in the coming weeks here is the latest report from RoozenGaarde. As you probably expected, blooms are a little behind schedule this year due to the prolonged cold weather.

snow geese, Skagit Valley Daffodils and Snow GeeseLarge flock of Snow Geese taking flight in the Skagit Valley  #15870

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Skagit Valley Washington Daffodil Fields

Skagit Valley Washington Daffodil Fields

Skagit Valley Washington Daffodil Fields #50652Skagit Valley Washington Daffodil Fields #50652

It’s hard to believe it’s already the beginning of March and spring is just around the corner! Although I enjoy winter and its snow it will be nice to return to warm weather and the fresh scent of leaves and flowers. One of the first exciting locations of the season here in the Pacific Northwest has to be the Skagit Valley Washington Daffodil Fields. In just a few short weeks the daffodils will be up and carpeting the valley with their bright yellow blossoms. Since the weather can still quite gloomy and wet at the end of March there aren’t as many tourist for the daffodils as there are for the showy tulips that come up several weeks later.

This image was made last year on my first visit to the flats, the local term for the farmlands and wetlands of the lower valley. As always it’s advisable to get there around daybreak  or late afternoon to be in a good position for good light. It’s essential to have a variety of lenses although a wide angle is the most useful, along with a good tripod graduated neutral density filters. Being late March the biggest concern you may face photographing the fields will be wind, as with most flowers the slightest breeze can set them in motion.

If you’d like to visit, the fields are just west of I-5 and Mount Vernon about 70 miles north of Seattle. While you’re in the area you can also check out the quaint shops and restaurants of La Conner. Also don’t forget to keep your eye out for the flocks of Snow Geese and Trumpeter Swans wintering in the farm fields to the south.

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More Skagit Valley Tulips

More Skagit Valley Tulips: This one is about as fresh as it gets, from this morning in the Skagit Valley. I woke up early enough to get down there in time for sunrise but had my doubts about the light since the sky was clear and the stars were out. To my pleasant surprise the Valley sported a thin layer of fog, perfect for adding some color and diffusing the light just enough. Working this field as the sun rose I was the only one there. It wasn’t until the light and drama had burned off that other photographers began to arrive!

Skagit Valley Tulips

Skagit Valley Tulip Sunrise #50889

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Skagit Valley Daffodils

Skagit Valley DaffodilsSkagit Valley Sunrise

Skagit Valley Daffodils : Daffodils are in full bloom right now in the Skagit Valley. On Saturday I got up early and made the drive down to catch a nice sunrise. There were only three other photographers taking advantage of the nice light. It looks like this year the tulips have been planted in some locations that are composition friendly, hopefully I’ll get some nice light to photograph them. However it will probably be another two weeks before they are in bloom.

Prints and licensing for the image in this post are available by clicking on the photo

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Skagit Valley Snow Geese

This winter there has been a lot of attention on the unusual amount of Snowy Owls migrating to the Pacific Northwest, but don’t forget that this is also prime viewing time for the migrations of Snow Geese and Trumpeter Swans. Like the annual Tulip Festival in April the Snow Geese are a prime attraction to the Lower Skagit Valley in Northwest Washington. From now until well into April huge flocks of these birds can be seen foraging in the farmlands west of the town of Mount Vernon, sometimes right alongside main roads.
If you make a trip to photograph these magnificent birds please remember that they are resting and foraging here to store energy for the long trip to the Arctic. Under no circumstances should you approach them or give cause to put the flocks in flight, this only causes undo stress on them and lessens their chance for survival.

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