New Images Part 2 New England

New Images Part 2 New England

Bass Harbor Lighthouse Maine New Images Part 2 New EnglandBass Harbor Lighthouse, Maine  #59018

The last portfolio of New Images from our recent photo trip to New England and Atlantic Canada is now ready for viewing. You can check out the portfolio here. And, as always, all of the photos are ready to purchase as fine art prints and commercial licensing.

This portfolio wraps up the edit and processing of all new images from the trip. However, in the coming weeks and months I’ll most likely be revisiting many of the files to identify which can be processed into black and white or alternative styles. I’ve already began this procedure with a group I made early on in the trip in the Bay of Fundy. This group of images, composed of just sea and clouds, represents a more minimalist style of photography that I very much enjoy. Be sure to check back soon to see a new post regarding these photos!

Click here to go to the portfolio of New Images

Some of the locations included in this portfolio are:

  • Acadia National Park Maine
  • Mahoosuc region Maine
  • Grafton Notch State Park Maine
  • White Mountains New Hampshire
  • Kancamagus Highway New Hampshire
  • Franconia Notch New Hampshire
  • Stowe Vermont
  • Groton woods Vermont
  • Woodstock Vermont
  • Newfane Vermont
  • Bennington Vermont
  • Ricketts Glen Pennsylvania

 

Foster Covered Bridge, Vermont New Images Part 2 New EnglandFoster Covered Bridge, Vermont  #59335

Peacham, Vermont New Images Part 2 New EnglandPeacham, Vermont  #59321

Bennington Battle Monument Vermont New Images Part 2 New EnglandBennington Battle Monument, Vermont  #59477

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New England Atlantic Canada Images

New England Atlantic Canada Images

Peggy's Cove Lighthouse, Nova Scotia New England Atlantic Canada ImagesPeggy’s Cove Lighthouse, Nova Scotia #58903    Purchase

Wow, what a busy week since our return home after six weeks and over 10,000 miles on the road! Aside from catching up on household chores, filling client orders, and general business tasks, I have a mountain of new images to get to. I’ve just begun the lengthy task of editing and processing all the files, but have made an initial pass and found some photos that stand out. I’m getting a bit ahead of myself by doing this. I usually wait until I have completed the full editing and image processing is complete, but since this project will take several weeks to complete I’m anxious to share with you some of the highlights so far.  We’ll also be sending out regular email progress updates in the coming weeks.

Bennington Battle Monument Vermont New England Atlantic Canada ImagesBennington Battle Monument, Vermont  #59478    Purchase

Within the next several days I’ll be posting a full gallery of new images from the first couple of locations covered on the trip, Medicine Rocks Montana and Watkins Glen New York. Make sure to check back often, here and on my Facebook page. And don’t forget, all of the images are immediately available for commercial licensing and as fine art prints!

Click here or on any image to view the portfolio of new work.

Locations and subject matter covered during this trip:

Nova Scotia: Cape Breton Highlands, Cabot Trail, Lunenburg, Peggy’s Cove, Blue Rocks
New Brunswick: Bay of Fundy, Fundy National Park
Maine: Acadia National Park, Grafton Notch
New Hampshire: White Mountains, Kancamagus Byway, Franconia Notch
Vermont: Stowe, Peacham, Groton Woods, Woodstock, Bennington, Newfane, and more
New York: Watkins Glen State Park
Pennsylvania: Ricketts Glen State Park
Fall foliage, covered bridges, barns, farms, towns, fall festivals, fishing, villages, waterfalls, historic sites, coastal scenes, seasonal farm stands

Blue Rocks Nova Scotia New England Atlantic Canada ImagesBlue Rocks, Nova Scotia #58824    Purchase

Vermont fall foliage reflection New England Atlantic Canada ImagesFall foliage, Pauline Lake Vermont #59457    Purchase

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Finding Fall Color in the Northwest Part One

Finding Fall Color in the Northwest Part One

This is a repost from last year. Since many of you are planning or already engaged with fall photography I wanted to make this post available once again. I’ll be leaving in a few days for  the Canadian Rockies with locations featuring these amazing trees at the top of my list. Have fun out there!

Western Larch #22000 Finding Fall Color in the Northwest Part OneWestern Larch (Larix occidentalis) #22000

 Just about everybody knows that the best fall color can be found in New England, or for that matter just about anywhere east of the Mississippi. The Rockies have spectacular displays of aspens, and even the Southwest can put on a good show. But here in the Pacific Northwest most of the color is found on Big Leaf and Vine Maples, but usually not in dense eye-popping displays. The main deciduous tree in Western Washington is the Alder which puts on a depressingly grayish brown color in October. A good compliment to the incessant rain but not very photogenic. What many not familiar with the Northwest know about are the magical displays of yellows golds and orange put on by two kinds of trees and where to find them. I’m referring to the Lyall’s or Subalpine Larch and the Western Larch, two coniferous trees that turn golden and shed their needles every fall. Both are found in very specific areas and with the right lighting they can put just about any Vermont forest to shame. But you’ll have to do your homework and legwork to find the best displays.Subalpine Larch North Cascades Washington 50058 Finding Fall Color in the Northwest Part OneSubalpine or Lyall’s Larch (Larix lyallii) #50058

The Lyall’s Larch is only found in alpine areas, generally above 5500′, in a narrow band from the eastern slopes of the North Cascades to the Purcell and Selkirk Mountains of British Columbia. They can also be found in the Canadian Rockies with Lake Louise roughly being their northern limits. Generally, though not a rule, they’re found in greater numbers on northeastern slopes. Aside from a few spots in the Canadian Rockies you’ll have to do some hiking to get to them. Some of the best spots like the Enchantments in Washington State demand a strenuous multi-day trek gaining over 5000′ feet of elevation along the way.

Hiking and photographing during the peak larch season on a calm sunny day is an experience you won’t soon forget. The sky at this altitude can be an intense blue contrasting against the vibrant gold of the trees. Tolkien fans will easily associate this experience with Lord Of The Rings chapter on Lothlorien.

Monica Meadows Purcell Mountains #25835 Finding Fall Color in the Northwest Part OnePurcell Mountains B.C. #25835

Aside from finding and hiking to the desired location you’ll have to keep a close eye on the timing and weather. The Lyall’s Larch generally start turning color in the last week of September. Peaking the first week of October and then gone by middle of the month. The peak of the season can last anywhere from two days to a week, depending on the weather. The needles of this tree are very soft and delicate. Once they start turning color they can easily fall off in a wind rain or snowstorm. The later of course being a common occurrence at that altitude.

Subalpine Larch (Larix lyallii) #49966 Finding Fall Color in the Northwest Part OneSubalpine or Lyall’s Larch (Larix lyallii) North Cascades #49966

The best photo opportunities for Lyall’s Larch are in groves scattered among rocky slopes and colorful alpine lakes. A good scenario would be to stay in a prime location for several days near some lakes. Clear sunny weather followed by cloudy weather and then a light dusting of snow is optimal. This happened to me last year when visiting the Purcell Mountains of B.C. After six days I came away with a wide variety of alpine landscape images. I was a bit nervous on the last day since it was snowing heavily. I wasn’t sure if my vehicle at the trailhead would be snowed in ! It turned out to be a close call, several more inches could have prevented my escape.To see more images of both species of larches click here to view images from my online archives.

Next installment, photographing the Western Larch.

Don’t forget that all the images in this post are available as fine art prints. Just click on an image you like and then the add to cart button for purchasing options. Don’t forget to also share this post and hit the Like button!

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Photographing Fall Color in Glacier National Park

Photographing Fall Color in Glacier National Park

Lake McDonald Glacier National Park Photographing Fall Color in Glacier National ParkLake McDonald, Glacier National Park  #22779
 
For most people Glacier National Park in Montana is a fabulous destination for hiking, photography, and family vacations.  But as summer ends and the crowds disappear the park gets ready to put on another show. Autumn here is a season that is not to be missed. The colors are just as good as many other popular destinations like the Colorado Rockies and the Grand Tetons of Wyoming. And as a bonus there are two separate displays of color a couple weeks apart. The first comes in late September or early October and the second display arrives in mid to late October.

Going to the Sun Road Glacier National Park Photographing Fall Color in Glacier National ParkGoing to the Sun Road, Glacier National Park  #20722

The first color show is the aspens turning gold in the lower elevations and the plants of the meadows changing at higher elevations. Some of the most spectacular displays of golden aspens is found along the Eastern slopes of the park, and extend into the prairies. From Many Glacier all the way up to and including Waterton National Park in Alberta there are countless groves of aspens. The two best spots are between Many Glacier and St. Mary.  Then further north along the Chief Mountain Highway towards Babb. Be forewarned though, all these locations are subject to very high winds. Aspen leaves are often stripped from the trees before they can even turn color. A couple of years ago I arrived in early October at what I thought would be peak color, however trees were still in summer green. A few days later snow storms settled in to blanket the entire park in an early winter, never giving the trees to put on a show. It’s always best to contact the visitors center for current conditions before heading out.

Aspens along Saint Mary Lake Glacier National Park Photographing Fall Color in Glacier National ParkAspens along Saint Mary Lake, Glacier National Park  #21052

The second show of color comes on the western half of the park from the stands of Western Larch (Larix occidentalis). Not to be confused with the Alpine or Lyall’s Larch (Larix lyallii), which are found at higher elevations. These are conifers that shed their needles every fall after they turn a brilliant golden color. Photographing Larches is a bit easier than the aspens. Their color change is more predictable and the color lasts longer too. In Glacier Park the best places to find dense stands of these trees is along the southern border of the park along Highway 2 west of Marias Pass. Other good locations are along the North Fork of the Flathead River on the western border of the park. Camas Road is also worth checking out. At the same time the Larches are at their peak the Cottonwoods are also turning color. One of the best places for these deciduous trees is along the shores of Lake McDonald. Beautiful photos can also be made during this time along McDonald creek where the leaves sprinkle the colorfully eroded rocks along the waters edge.
 

Larch Forest Glacier National Park Photographing Fall Color in Glacier National ParkWestern Larch (Larix occidentalis)  #22000

 
McDonald Creek Valley Glacier National Park Photographing Fall Color in Glacier National ParkMcDonald Creek Valley, Glacier National Park  #20346
 
Another bonus to visiting this time of year is that the Going to the Sun Road may be closed. The absence of cars allows you to leisurely walk along the road. You can photograph scenes that were not possible when the road is open. If you’re lucky there will be some fresh snow higher up on the mountains.  This will add a dramatic element to the fall color. If all this isn’t enough to keep you busy don’t forget this is also prime time to photograph Elk during the annual rut. They make a great evening serenade while your reviewing your days work in an empty campground.
Maple Leaf Glacier National Park Photographing Fall Color in Glacier National ParkLeaf on rocks Glacier National Park  #20150
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Monica Meadows and Jumbo Pass

Monica Meadows and Jumbo Pass

Emperor Peak from Monica Meadows, Purcell Mountains, Monica Meadows and Jumbo PassEmperor Peak from Monica Meadows, Purcell Mountains  #25563  Purchase

The first group of images from our 2009 fall photography trip is now ready for viewing and licensing at our online archives. There are two main locations represented, Monica Meadows and Jumbo Pass in British Columbia’s Purcell Mountains.  The other being the eastern slopes of Glacier National Park Montana.
Monica Meadows and Jumbo Pass have been on my must see list for a number of years. They certainly were worth the wait though. Monica Meadows sports several quiet alpine basins dotted with pretty tarns and golden larches. And although it is a popular destination there were few people there on my 5 day visit. Aside from the lovely meadows the main attraction is the spectacular view across the valley. The Macbeth and Truce Groups  are impressive rugged peaks draped with large hanging glaciers.
Monica Meadows Purcell Mountains, Monica Meadows and Jumbo PassLarches along lake in Monica Meadows, Purcell Mountains  #25775  Purchase
 
A couple of miles further from Monica Meadows is the very popular Jumbo Pass. Here there are beautiful ridge walks a few small tarns and more great views. Another reason Jumbo Pass is popular is the presence of a newly refurbished alpine hut which sees regular use in the summer for hikers and skiers in the winter. While I planned on camping during my visit the cold snowy weather made this hut a welcome alternative. During my stay I read about the history of the Purcell mountains and its human presence, most notably the recent attempts to halt the development of an ill conceived ski resort in a nearby valley. I would encourage everyone reading this blog to click on the following links to learn more about this issue and take action against it.
 Monica Meadows, Purcell Mountains

Storm clouds over Monica Meadows Purcell Mountains, Monica Meadows and Jumbo PassStorm Clouds over Monica Meadows, Purcell Mountains  #25552  Purchase

Early season snowfall Jumbo Pass Purcell Mountains, Monica Meadows and Jumbo PassEarly season snowfall at Jumbo Pass, Purcell Mountains  #25984   Purchase
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I had planned on spending several days here, however a new storm threatened to bury the pass in deep snow. This change in weather prompted me to leave after only a couple of days. Although I didn’t get photos of gorgeous light on fall colors I was offered some interesting photos of stormy weather!
For some great reading on the history and culture of the Purcell and Columbia Mountains region check out the books available from MAA Press
Jumbo Pass hut Purcell Mountains, Monica Meadows and Jumbo PassJumbo Pass Hut, Purcell Mountains  #25890   Purchase
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